Tuscany, Italy

4 days / 20 talks
Awesome and great speakers

October 16-21
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Michael Monschau

MIchael Monschau (Brainy Data Limited) joined the Tiger Logic (then Blyth Software) engineering team at Mitford House in 1989. Having worked in core engineering since Omnis 3 Plus days, Michael has been responsible for the design and implementation of many of the Omnis’ features that developers enjoy today. He was a key person in charge of various large projects when Omnis Studio was conceived, including the design and implementation of the cross-platform graphics, windows and printing modules, the new window and report design modes, printing devices, and the web-client technology, to name but a few.

In 2003 Michael formed Brainy Data, a company dedicated to providing consultancy services to Omnis developers, and over the next few years designed and developed Omnis software components such as OWrite, PDFDevice and OCal. Brainy Data is now in its eleventh year and more than 200 Omnis Developers use Brainy Data products.

In more recent years Michael rejoined the Mitford engineering team for a period and helped with the design and implementation of the new JS Client technology.


A new way of looking at your data

Find out how to provide powerful interfaces for ad-hoc reports, projects, booking systems and schedules, and learn how the latest Brainy Data JavaScript controls have transferred this power to web-client development.

This commercial session will present tools with which users can create sophisticated documents for data merging, manage appointments and large projects, produce PDF/A documents for long-term archiving, create rich HTML mail-shots, create user customised invoices and much more.

The presentation focuses on Brainy Data’s five main products, OWrite, PDFDevice, OSpell2, OGantt and OCal. OWrite looks and behaves like a word processor allowing end-users to feel right at home, but was specifically designed with Omnis data in mind. Its specialised features coupled with its word-processing capabilities make OWrite an indispensable tool, providing end users with an easy-to-use powerful interface for managing the appearance of their documents, and providing developers with the programmability to truly control every aspect of ad-hoc reporting and related automated processes. PDFDevice has been highly optimised for speed and is preferred by many Omnis developers as the tool for producing PDF files from Omnis. It is ideally suited for converting OWrite documents into professional looking PDF documents complete with document outline tress based on OWrite heading styles. OSpell2 is the only way to add check-as-you-type spellchecking to your Omnis application. For those interested in appointment scheduling, project management or booking systems, the OGantt and OCal presentation will show how easy it is to add a graphical interactive interface to your application that is not just intuitive but also very fast. All desktop client tools are written in c++ for ultimate performance.

If you have not yet explored the Omnis Studio JS-Client, perhaps now is the time. With the arrival of JS-OWrite there is one less stumbling-block to providing rich and powerful interfaces on javascript capable devices. For Brainy Data, the Javascript client is an on-going long-term project and we aim to port all our interface tools to this new platform. We have already developed and released JS-Signature for mobile document signing and are currently nearing the end of a very long road, namely porting OWrite to JS-Client. We are hoping JS-Owrite will be in final beta release prior to the EurOmnis conference. The JS-OWrite presentation will showcase the creating, editing and data-merging of rich documents from within a Javascript enabled browser.


Inside Omnis Notation: Studio 8

Find out the difference between built-in and custom notation, how to squeeze extra performance out of methods, what notation to use in JS Client, and learn about the structure, intricacies, pitfalls and benefits of notation within Studio 8.

This session aims to give an inside view of notation: explain what notation is, how it works, and how the use of notation differs or is similar within JS Client-, Omnis Server- and Fat-Client programming. The session is divided into two parts and the first part is concerned with notation basics such as the overall concept and different types of notation. In the second part we will cover some of the more specialised notation relevant to JS Client, Omnis Server programming and Desktop Client programming. There may not be time to cover all of the specialised notation and although there will be a focus on differences and similarities between JS Client, Omnis Server

and Fat-Client notation, we may also look at other notation of special interest, such as reporting.

You will learn about:-

  • –  notation as a hierarchical description of the Omnis environment
  • –  the difference between build-in and custom notation, properties and methods, instance and class notation.
  • –  the power of notation in manipulating window/remote forms and their objects.
  • –  the benefits and relevance of notation in inheritance.
  • –  different performance tricks that can be utilised within sever-client and fat-client models.
  • –  notation new to Studio 8
  • –  notation and the Studio 8 code assistant Optional modules:-

– Java Script Client (server/client module overview and detailed look at special client and server notation)
– Special Interest Notation (object variable, complex grid, list notation, report notation)


JSCOMP development: Studio 8 JavaScript controls

Learn how to develop custom remote form controls using JavaScript such as rich content interactive result sets (no C++ required) and learn how to provide an optional design interface for your custom controls (C++ required).

This year, the external component development presentation has been split into four distinct sessions as it is not possible to cover all aspects of external component development in a single morning or afternoon. The title and short description for each XCOMP or JSCOMP session summarises its focus, but some of the material covered may overlap with material from the two remaining sessions.

This particular session will focus on writing your own javascript client component. It is possible to write custom controls without the use of c++ and the first part of this presentation will concentrate on just doing that. This first part was completely rewritten for 2016 and has already been presented at the German Conference near Frankfurt earlier this year. The second part will introduce the developer to writing a design interface using c++. If there is time spare at the end of the presentation, we may visit other material related to external component development in Studio.


XCOMP development: Studio 8 reports, objects and devices

Learn how to inject special data into Omnis reports and how to convert report data to custom formats.

This year, the external component development presentation has been split into four distinct sessions as it is not possible to cover all aspects of external component development in a single morning or afternoon. The title and short description for each XCOMP or JSCOMP session summarises its focus, but some of the material covered may overlap with material from the two remaining sessions.

This particular session will focus on what is required to develop external report objects and printing devices. External report objects provide control over how data is formatted within reports and external devices produce the final output of a report. You will learn how a single external library can provide both report objects and devices and how they can communicate with each other. Ever wanted to change the HTML device to better suit your needs, here is your chance to learn how. If there is time spare at the end of the presentation, we may visit other material related to external component development in Studio.


XCOMP development: Studio 8 non-visual objects, functions and constants

Learn how to inject special data into Omnis reports, how to convert report data to custom formats or simply how to add your own global functions and constants to the catalogue.

This year, the external component development presentation has been split into four distinct sessions as it is not possible to cover all aspects of external component development in a single morning or afternoon. The title and short description for each XCOMP or JSCOMP session summarises its focus, but some of the material covered may overlap with material from the two remaining sessions.

This particular session will focus on what is required to develop non-visual objects to add your own object variable types, functions and constants to the Omnis environment. Object variables are a great way to encapsulate functionality not provided by Omnis into a single class object. External objects, such as FileOps, can be inherited (as demonstrated in the “Inside Omnis Notation” session) and its functions can be overridden. External non-visual objects are ideal for extending the functionality of Omnis in an object orientated way. If there is time spare at the end of the presentation, we may visit other material related to external component development in Studio.


XCOMP development: Studio 8 Window Controls, Cocoa and 64 bit

Learn what is involved in developing custom window controls in the light of Studio 8 COCOA and 64 bit changes.

This year, the external component development presentation has been split into four distinct sessions as it is not possible to cover all aspects of external component development in a single morning or afternoon. The title and short description for each XCOMP or JSCOMP session summarises its focus, but some of the material covered may overlap with material from the two remaining sessions.

This particular session will focus on writing desktop client window controls. The first part will introduce the developer to the basics of providing a design and runtime interface. The second part will focus on Cocoa and 64bit porting considerations. If there is time spare at the end of the presentation, we may visit some of the material of the remaining two external component presentations. If there is time spare at the end of the presentation, we may visit other material related to external component development in Studio.



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About workshops

Format

You’ll sign up for the session you want to attend on a first-come, first-served basis. Up to 6 participants may attend a session, if full, you can sign up for the same topic at a different time. During the session, the speaker will guide the audience through the main topic but you will be able to ask him/her to deviate and cover related areas. Sometimes participants offer new ideas and solutions to a problem.



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Speakers

Pursue any question or area not directly related to the core topic. Every speaker hosts at least 4 sessions which means there are about 11 to 12 simultaneous sessions running all the time with an average of 5 or 6 participants

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Schedule

Flexible conference format means you can choose the best classes for you and at the best time. Some sessions will be repeated, so when you miss one, you can attend the same session later in the day or the week.

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